This Business Analyst Shares the Best Career Advice She Ever Received

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Odds are you’ve received a lot of advice, especially career advice, over the years. But, we’re willing to bet some of that advice was better than others.

At The Muse, we strive to give our readers the best actionable advice we can, so you can find the career of your dreams. Here, we talked with Nasim Andrews, a Business Analyst at Core Digital Media, to share the best career advice she’s ever received.

Tell us about your career journey.

Ever since I was 10 years old I wanted to be a doctor. I did everything in the books to try to achieve this: volunteering, clinical trial research, etc. I loved it, but as I got closer to the real world, my interests led me elsewhere.

In college, I helped turn a small UCLA organization into a national non-profit, which spurred my interest in business. I love science, numbers, and the idea of helping others, but business felt like a better fit than medicine. I put medical school on hold while I tried consulting—and I’ve never looked back.

During my first year as a consultant in San Francisco, CA, I discovered that I enjoy seeing how different aspects of a company work together to make it successful or unsuccessful. I also realized that I wanted a career that bridged many areas of business (marketing, sales, product), and that I wanted to work in an industry that was constantly growing and expanding. This led me to a job in the technology industry at Core Digital Media.

What’s the best career advice you’ve ever received?

Work should never feel like work. When you walk into the office, you should be excited for what the day will bring. You shouldn’t mind working late, and you should embrace all the obstacles. If you don’t, it’s not the right place for you.

Who gave you this advice?

After my first year of college, I went home to spend my summer shadowing a doctor. He became a mentor and has given me so much valuable advice, which I’ve used throughout my career.

What’s your best career advice for others?

If you feel as though you are learning or being challenged less than 50% of your day at work—that’s when it’s time for a change.